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20130126
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unequivocally why diplomacy and development are right up there with defense. we think about who we are as americans, it's because we are united and committed across our government to do what ever is required -- whatever is required to fulfill the missions we have assumed as public officials and public servants. so next week i would expect that all of you will be as focused and dedicated for secretary kerry as you have been for me and that you will continue to serve president obama and our nation with the same level of professionalism and commitment that i have seen firsthand. on a personal basis, let me wish all of you the very best, whether you've been here a week or 30 or even 40 years. [laughter] let me give you the very best wishes that i can because i'm proud to have been a part of you. i leave thinking of the nearly 70,000 people that was honored to serve and lead as part of a huge extended family. and i hope that you will continue to make yourselves, make me and make our country proud. thank you all and god bless you. [cheers and applause] [cheers and applause] >> thank you.
on the national defense authorization act and she decided to introduce an amendment, we have to work in a way where it would not come up and say, let's repeal the entire policy. let's give commanders the flexibility to assign women to wherever they need to be, wherever they meet the needs of the battle grounds. that was replaced, substituted by an amendment of a report that came out in february. that is how the report came out. that started it going, a little more press, a little more engaging in this topic. we decided to present this caucus called the women in the military caucus. it was formed in order to develop a forum where we can discuss this issue. it was such a, do not touch this issue kind of deal. she just wanted this time and this form to get into the details of this policy and bring in experts to talk about this. we had a couple of briefings here and there. for all defense policies and congressional laws, it goes into the national defense authorization act. for the entire year, what i am doing is can he ready for that time. it is extremely difficult to get past all of the challeng
. it is not just a matter of not being on the defensive in the debate. bringing up the hard cases for the other guy. it is also about making long- term arguments about what government has done. all too often, not just our candidates but people on the front lines often find our content with the talking points. the clinton problem is that it's a political problem. -- cocoon problem is not just a political problem. how to reengage more -- people in this room in impacting this argument. creating a space where politicians are more comfortable doing it. >> one challenge that we have with appealing to women voters, i think it is also true of men who are -- who only have a high school diploma are have trouble finding a good job. and obama's america, we are all having trouble finding a good job. [laughter] women think that when they are voting for democrats they are voting for security. single women, many of whom have children and who feel quite vulnerable to job losses or any change in the economy or anything that might around in their own lives -- might go wrong in their own lives. they want that safety n
] and not have to worry about the law. obama was very interesting. in my defense, a week before or two weeks before the election in l.a., i routed column suffering from myself rather severely, to use a romney word, from some of my colleagues on the right to have defected to obama and i named them. i said i was going down with the mccain ship because i knew it was going out and i would not waver. i never imagined i would support obama over mccain. i was very strongly for mccain. i thought he was a very good man. he did not run a very strong campaign. we seem to have a habit of doing that. but here's what was interesting about obama. if you remember the transition, he made very centrist appointments. for example, he kept the gates at the fence. he picked geithner for treasury, who had worked hand in glove with the bush administration through the financial crisis. he picked hillary as secretary of state. blogger was one of the major advisers. volcker was one of the major red visors. when he ran in 2008, he ran as a roar short chest. he was not a very disturbing the radical candidate. that was t
there with the defense. it is because we are united and committed to do whatever is required to fulfill the missions we have assumed as public officials and public servants. so next week, i would expect that all of you will be as focused and dedicated for secretary kerry as you have been for me, and that you will continue to serve president obama and our nation with the same level of professionalism and commitment that i have seen firsthand. on a personal basis, let me wish all of you the very best, whether you have been here all week, or 30, or even 40 years, pat. [laughter] let me give you the very best wishes that i can, because i am proud to have been a part of you. i'll be thinking of the nearly 70,000 people thought -- i leave it thinking of the nearly 70,000 people that i was honored to serve and leave as part of a huge extended family, and i hope that you will continue to make yourselves, make me, and make our country proud. thank you all, and god bless you. [cheers and applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >>
, and they are your best line of defense against ad policy. -- bad policuy. host: we want to take our viewers to a live event at the brookings institute. it is the evolution of joints -- a force operations command and the pursuit of al qaeda in iraq. it is a conversation with general stanley mcchrystal, also featuring mike o'hanlon of brookings. thanks so much for joining us on "the washington journal." [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] mf good morning, everyone. welcome to brookings. thanks for coming out. it is an unusual treat, even at a place where we have such amazing events, to have general stanley mcchrystal here today. i am mike o'hanlon, one of the members of the 21st century defense initiative. we are hosting this event with bruce riddell, who runs the -- first readout -- bruce riddell .- bruce ridedel, general mcchrystal build up an organization into what was the state-of-the-art capability that ultimately led not only to our topic of today, the tracking and ultimate killing of the al qaeda terrorist zar
of their brother. maybe it comes from his college football days as defensive back under the legendary john galardi. i always tease him and that he made up for modest talents with extraordinary dedication and a high threshold for pain. [laughter] this does remind me of the one topic that we will never agree, biking versus bears. -- vikings versus bears, and there's another reason we all love him so much, and that is his decency, his respect for those around him. ask any of the staff that are here today, and they will tell you despite the unbelievable pressures of service at this level, denis mcdonough is still the first to think about a colleague, or write a hand- written note to say thank you, or to ask about your family. that is the spirit that i want in this white house. this, of course, is reflected in his incredible love for his own family, liam, teddy -- i know that dad has been at work a lot during the week and on weekends, and i guarantee he would much rather be with you than with me, but the next job he will have will be demanding, two, but the one reason he does this is because he wants
was a journalist. i did not believe i could lead to someone's defense and lead to the others defense but if i ask a question i want an answer. this is my style. i went through this thing when i was first chosen, thinking, i am not george stephanopoulos, but i was chosen for who i am and i was chosen for whatever body of work and have that i am proud of and i felt that -- the only thing i would say is different, i spent a lot of time on the questions. i crammed my head as much as i could and remembered things, but to me, i did what pointed questions and i wanted answers. we all have interviewed public figures and usually get 20 minutes and 18 minutes and you don't want to hound them over one topical item -- you cannot help but be part of this. you are looked at because of the questions you ask and what you contribute in the wake of that debate. >> there is another question having to do with the moderator's, and that was this business of, the political party is getting an answer to the question, what is the sistine mets going to be devoted to? devoted to economics or foreign policy, iraq and iran,
defense. that probably hurt him. i do not think at that time he was ahead. one of the things i base this on, i started out that debate asking him a pretty pointed question about benghazi. republicans were really criticizing the president for this. this was a place where if governor romney really wanted to take on the president, he could have done it. he just sort of skipped by that question and went on to something else. i think he was afraid he did not want to appear overly aggressive and i think that was probably a mistake on his part. >> the reverse was true. obama for the first debate. he thought he was a hit and thought he could coast and he paid a price for it. >> yes, please. >> i am a washington d.c. resident. my question is for mr. schieffer. considering what you discussed about how most americans are watching news that is tailored to their political views and candidates are going on those news shows, this is one of the only opportunities for those 60 million americans to see a candidate willing to challenge them. do you think that changes the role the moderator plays in th
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)

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